Talent management – the key to global mobility success?

The independent community for international HR and mobility professionals, RES Forum has highlighted the vital importance of talent management to companies and organisations with global ambitions in its Key Trends in Global Mobility 2014.

The independent community for international HR and mobility professionals, RES Forum has highlighted the vital importance of talent management to companies and organisations with global ambitions in its Key Trends in Global Mobility 2014.Its author, Michael Dickmann, Professor of International Human Resource Management and Dean of Cranfield Univerity School of Management argues that the strategic role and talent management link are increasingly seen as key to global mobility success. &#x;The core view of the function entails four main value propositions: due diligence and programme compliance, expert on global people effectiveness, an inherent part of global talent management and global mobility as strategic advisor to the business.&#x;To professionals in the field it is no surprise that global mobility resourcing is historically driven by short-term business needs. In addition, a strong rationale is also leadership development. An unusual, major trend is to use international assignments for organisational transformation and restructuring. This adds a further, strategic dimension to the work of global mobility departments.&#x; He comments.Chapter two of the report focuses on this issue and shows that more than two thirds of organisations have a dedicated top talent strategy and almost half have a talent pipeline. Professor Dickmann says, &#x;There is a perception amongst mobility professionals that the effectiveness of worldwide talent is being supported by global mobility management. However, long-term career planning through global mobility for the leaders of the future is still in its infancy in many organisations.&#x;In the global war for talent, the ability to attract the right resources, develop them, provide them with motivation opportunities and careers as well as performance manage them, is crucial for organisational competitiveness.&#x;Firefighting in the shape of immediate business needs &#x; including the completion of short term projects &#x; is a key objective. However, the developmental purpose of international assignments is high.&#x;The report also reveals that RES Forum members have an unusually high propensity to use global mobility for organisational transformation or restructuring showing the global integration of their operations. This, says Professor Dickmann, &#x;supports the move towards a more strategic purpose of global mobility.&#x;When hiring employees, only about a quarter of organisations (26%) assess whether the candidates are likely to be internationally mobile in the future.&#x;Global Talent Management is, without doubt, a key driver for the RES Forum organisations. More than two thirds of organisations (70%) have a dedicated top talent strategy to develop future leaders. 63% of organisations have as one of their main objectives &#x;to develop future senior leaders&#x; and 46% want to &#x;provide country/business unit leaders&#x;&#x;About half of the corporations have talent pipelines (emerging, senior leaders who are promotion ready) across all levels of the organisation and across all regions.The report notes that repatriation and subsequent career progression has become a &#x;hot topic&#x; in recent years. &#x;Several observers claim that this is one of the key problems in international mobility. The lack of career progression and the potential reverse culture shock is a major problem for repatriates&#x;But the problem is not only for individuals. In organisations in which career progression after return is endangered, fewer high potential staff are willing to go and work abroad. Some organisations have factored these challenges into their international mobility policies and practices.&#x;The survey responses give a sobering picture with respect to long-term leadership planning through global assignments.&#x;Less than a tenth (9%) of organisations consider career planning up to two positions beyond repatriation. This is likely to be connected to the dynamic labour market and management churn. &#x;It is ironic, however, that repatriates who had gone on a developmental assignment had the (slightly) higher propensity to leave the organisation in the first three years after return. In addition, only 6.5% of RES Forum member organisations track the career progression of returning assignees.&#x;While the large assignee populations in the RES Forum member organisations indicate that organisations see the value of international work, the instances of active measurement for return on investment of global assignments is 2%.&#x; A figure that the report calls an &#x;astonishingly low number.&#x;It concludes, &#x;If global mobility functions truly want to become a strategic advisor, it is likely that more attention has to be devoted to this area.&#x;To read more about the RES Forum Annual Report 2104 Key Trends in Global Mobility go to: RES Forum identifies key trends in global mobilityTo receive a copy of the report, email res.forum@yahoo.co.uk quoting Re:locate MagazineFor further information please visit: theresforum.com&#x;&#x;&#x;&#x;