UK's relationship with Europe is black cloud for business warns WPP chief

Sir Martin Sorrell, chief executive of media and advertising giant WPP, has said that the UK's precarious position in Europe is "the big black cloud" on the horizon for British business.

Sir Martin Sorrell, chief executive of media and advertising giant WPP, has said that the UK's precarious position in Europe is "the big black cloud" on the horizon for British business. Speaking at the Telegraph Festival of Business, the WPP chief said, "The biggest cloud on the horizon, on the basis that the Conservatives are in government, is Europe. I think that is the big black cloud. It introduces a level of uncertainty among investors looking at the UK. That's the hornet's nest." Sorrell's comments echoed those of CBI director general John Cridland on Friday. Cridland articulated fears that the case for EU membership from business will be swept away by anti-immigration sentiment. At the festival of business, Sorrell pointed to high levels of unemployment among young people as the main concern for the European economy. "The general level of unemployment at the youth level is twice the level of the wider workforce in many cases. There's a political cost here: we see it in France, we see it in Spain, we see it in the UK." Sorrell said it's disillusioned young people who are driving the shift towards political extremes in Europe. He characterised UKIP's policy on immigration as "totally unacceptable". Over the weekend UKIP came under further high profile fire. Sir John Major called UKIP 'profoundly un-British'. Speaking on The Andrew Marr Show the former UK Prime Minister said, “The policies of UKIP, the direction of UKIP is, it seems to me, profoundly un-British in every way. They are anti-everything. They are anti-politics, they are anti-foreigner, they are anti-immigrant, they are anti-aid. I don’t know what they’re for. “We know what they are against, and that’s the negativity of the four-ale bar. That’s not the way to get into parliament and not the way to run a country.” Source: The Telegraph

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