Financial support for EU students in England to stay

EU students enrolling in UK universities in 2019 will receive the same financial support as students from the UK the government has announced.

UK university lecture hall
The UK government has announced that EU students enrolling at English universities in the autumn of 2019 will receive the same financial support throughout their courses as indigenous students.

EU students studying in the UK

Education Secretary Damian Hinds said that, despite Brexit, next year’s EU27 students starting courses in England would pay the same tuition fees as home undergraduates and that their access to financial loans would be unchanged throughout their studies.“Students from the EU make an important contribution to the universities sector and it is a testament to our system that so many students from abroad choose to come and study here. Today we are providing clarity and certainty on their fees for the duration of their courses,” Mr Hinds said on Monday.“I want everyone with the talent and potential to be able to take advantage of our world class universities.“We’ve already raised the amount of money graduates need to earn before starting to pay back their student loans, and freezing tuition fees for another year is another example of the steps the government is taking to support those in higher education.”Were EU students to be treated the same as other foreign students after Brexit, their fees would soar compared to the £9,250 maximum they currently pay. The Scottish government has already made a similar commitment to next year’s European enrolments, which means they will not pay any tuition fees. Universities in Northern Ireland currently charge EU students £4,160 per year in tuition fees and £9,000 in Wales – but their plans for 2019-20 have yet to be announced.
Related stories:For more related news and features, visit our Education and Schools section.  

Ensuring continuity for EU students

Alistair Jarvis, chief executive of Universities UK, welcomed the government’s announcement as providing “much needed clarity for EU students and for universities”.He added, “Students from EU countries can now apply for places on undergraduate courses starting in autumn 2019 with the confidence that they will not have to pay up-front tuition fees and will remain eligible to receive government-backed loans to cover their tuition fee for the duration of their courses.“EU students make an important contribution to our universities, enriching our campuses culturally and academically.“Another year of freezing tuition fee levels (announced by the government last November) for English students will put additional pressures on university finances.Universities continue to work hard to seek efficiencies and deliver value for money for students.”Tim Bradshaw, chief executive of the Russell Group, which represents most of the UK’s leading universities, said, “Today’s announcement could not have come a moment too soon. Applications open in a just a few months and many prospective students are already attending open days and making their decisions.“It is important that, after Brexit, the UK can continue to compete as a top destination for international talent.“Russell Group universities receive over 100,000 applications from EU students each year. They enrich campus life and provide a welcome boost to the UK economy.”The BBC reported that, at University College London, some 4,400 students – almost 10 per cent of the total – currently come from EU27 countries. The University of Edinburgh has 3,600 EU students, about 11 per cent of its total, while the London School of Economics has almost 2,000, representing almost 18 per cent. Cambridge has more than 2,500, or about 13 per cent of the student body.Relocate’s new Global Mobility Toolkit provides free information, practical advice and support for HR, global mobility managers and global teams operating overseas.Access hundreds of global services and suppliers in our Online DirectoryClick to get to the Relocate Global Online Directory 

Related Articles